Painters' Blog

Who was Pablo Picasso?

Who was Pablo Picasso?

Pablo Picasso was the most dominant and influential artist of the first half of the 20thĀ century. Associated most of all with pioneeringĀ Cubism, alongsideĀ Georges Braque, he also inventedĀ collageĀ and made major contributions toĀ SymbolismĀ andĀ Surrealism. He saw himself above all as a painter, yet his sculpture was greatly influential, and he also explored areas as diverse as printmaking and ceramics. Finally, he was a famously charismatic personality; his many relationships with women not only filtered into his art but also may have directed its course, and his behavior has come to embody that of the bohemian modern artist in the popular imagination. Did you...

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Da Vinci or Michelangelo, who inspired the creation of Painting by Numbers?

Da Vinci or Michelangelo, who inspired the creation of Painting by Numbers?

Dan Robbins created the first pictures and helped popularize paint-by-numbers kits in the 1950s.Ā  The idea for paint-by-numbers started when Robbins' boss asked him to come up with an item that could be geared towards adults. Robbins got inspiration for the product from Leonardo da Vinci. The famous artist would hand out numbered designs to apprentices. Robbins took that concept and evolved it into paint-by-numbers. Robbins based his concept on Leonardo da Vinciā€™s teaching system of numbering sections of his canvases for apprentices to complete. ā€œI remembered hearing about how Leonardo da Vinci would challenge his own students or apprentices...

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William Morris the father of the successful painting "Tree of Life"

William Morris the father of the successful painting "Tree of Life"

William Morris was born in 1834 in Walthamstow, Essex, the third of nine children. William's father, after whom he was named, was a self-made business man, who was able to provide an upper-middle-class lifestyle for his family because of a shrewd investment in a Devonshire mine. Although William Morris Senior died when his son was just thirteen, the wealth he had accumulated provided a generous income for the artist well into his adult life. Few artists left such a wide and indelible mark on the art, culture, and politics of their era as William Morris did on the second half...

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Jigsaw Puzzles, Why They Are Good for Your Brain?

Jigsaw Puzzles, Why They Are Good for Your Brain?

Susan Vandermorris is a clinical neuropsychologist at Torontoā€™s Baycrest Health Sciences, a global leader in brain health and aging research. Any type of puzzle is good for the brain and points to the stress-relieving benefits of jigsaws, in particular, she says. ā€œIf youā€™re doing a puzzle, you are, by definition, disconnected and engaged in a task thatā€™s immersive, away from the interruptions and stresses of day-to-day life,ā€ she explains. ā€œAnd that, of course, is good for your brain.ā€ Vandermorris believes that doing puzzles with others boasts even more health benefits than doing them on your own, adding that it provides...

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Monet and Impressionism - The Legacy

Monet and Impressionism - The Legacy

Impressionism is arguably the most famousĀ French paintingĀ movement ever. The actual name "Impressionism" was coined by the French art criticĀ Louis Leroy, after visiting the first exhibition of ImpressionistĀ paintingĀ in 1874 where he sawĀ Impression: Soleil LevantĀ (1872) by Claude Monet. Ironically, Monet only decided on the title when completing the exhibition catalogue, and almost named the workĀ View of the Harbour at Le Havre! In total, between 1874 and 1882, the Impressionists staged seven exhibitions, all in Paris. First appearing in Paris during the late 1860s and early 1870s, Impressionism was not recognized initially as anything special. The Impressionists were able to gather up these...

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